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91
Installation Questions / Re: Windows 8 / 8.1
« Last post by barragan on August 05, 2014, 12:08:36 PM »
We are working a release supporting Windows 8, and Macosx 10.9, osx should be up by the weekend and Windows in the following days. Linux will take a bit longer.
92
Installation Questions / Windows 8 / 8.1
« Last post by fraser on August 02, 2014, 09:36:53 AM »
I realise this project has not been updated for a while, but I was wondering if anyone has the Wiring IDE working in Windows 8 or 8.1?

I have recently dug out my old board for a little project I have planned - but I can't seem to compile anything using the Wiring IDE.

The errors I get are from avr-g++.exe when trying to compile.

C:\wiring\tools\avr\bin\avr-g++.exe: *** fatal error - couldn't allocate heap

I have tried a few things such as compatibility mode and unblocking but I just can't get it to work.

Any help much appreciated!

Thanks
93
I think its not. the FTDI driver.....  You forgot to remove  a sign by installing Java, this is the only install I know wich installing this toolbar.....


Rob
94
I was really happy to install Wiring 1.0 build 100 yesterday on my Mac laptop. I also installed the FTDI drivers that came with it. (incidentally, these rename the COM1 and COM2 ports but I used bluetooth port names and it started working.)

What surprised me is that I had to unlock my Mac (OSX 10.9.4) to allow an unsigned and uncertificated driver to be installed, but I trust Wiring. I am extremely careful about who i unlock for.

To my surprise, after installing the driver and rebooting, my web browser (Chrome) started up with a different homepage and toolbar, something like the ask tool bar that Java tries to stick you with.

But the only installation done was the FTDI drivers for wiring. (FTDIUSBSerialDriver_v2_2_16.dmg Created: Monday, February 28, 2011 at 9:50 AM)

So either somebody hacked the drivers to put in this toolbar, or the extension was put in without consent, or i got it from another source.

I appreciate Wiring and I don't mind bloatware if I am asked first because then I can say no.

Anyway thanks for making such a great program and sorry for any inconvenience this report may cause.
95
Wiring Implementations / Re: Dot Matrix Pen Write Screen
« Last post by barragan on July 10, 2014, 11:02:54 PM »
Great project, this is very cool, I saw a tutorial long ago regarding the possibility of using an LED as both sensor and actuator by switching the pin very quickly with the microcontroller. Is is possible also use it "touching" right? (not just with the pen)
best.
96
Wiring Implementations / Dot Matrix Pen Write Screen
« Last post by kathyelecfreaks on July 08, 2014, 04:28:36 AM »
We were just wondering in the current market where capacitive touch screens, resistive touch screens, TFT displays are flooding, DIY enthusiasts have been rarely used dot matrix screens. Here we use 5mm 8 * 8 dot matrix screen and phototransistor to achieve a pen write function. Sounds fun? But how to specifically make it? Can we achieve a larger area pen write?



I. Target
To realize pen write on dot matrix.

II. Hardware
LED matrix, UNO, flowerpad, 74ls138, PNP transistor, LM358, photosensitive triode, resistors (22K, 1K), pins




III. Circuit
The project is mainly composed of three parts: row scan circuit, column scan circuit, the pen’s circuit. The principle block is as shown below. It has a photosensitive sensor in the pen, we use this pen to get the states of LED.



Analysis:

 

1. Row scan

Make decoder’s Y0, Y1…effective in turn, but 74ls138 output low level on corresponding pin if have a effective input, because our dot matrix is common anode, we need an inverter, we use PNP transistor to constitute a inverter. Every eight times column scanning on a row scan.

2. Column scan

Make decoder’s Y0, Y1…effective in turn, and input PWM on OE1, if OE1 is high level, Y0~Y7 are high level,if OE1 is low level, ABC pin decide decoder’s output. When enable some line, we make decoder’s Y0, Y1…effective in turn, and we can control every LED’s brightness by OE1.

3. Pen

Set the reference voltage at the inverting input of comparator at a certain value, and in-phase input voltage will be less than this value when the pen receives light, vice versa. The current through R3 is very small if light is insufficient, so in-phase input voltage will be closer to the power supply voltage, and comparator outputs high level. The current through R3 will increase if light intensity increases, and the voltage of R3 will increase, so in-phase input voltage will decrease, then comparator outputs low level. MCU can catch this change and then does the corresponding processing.

IV. Program Analysis
To detect state of the points on the dot matrix we must light LED, and make it in the dim state, when the pen gets close to some point, we set the point highlight. But how do we know the coordinates of this point? The principle is: let LED light up one by one,the first of the first line, then the second of the first line…, until the last of the first line. Turn again the first of the second line, light up LED in turn in a loop. Every LED has state value: 0 stands for the dim state, 1 stands for highlight state. When the pen gets close to some point but it’s not the point’s turn to light up, because the pen did not detect light,it maintains a high level at the output of the comparator. When it’s turn to light up this point, comparator outputs a low level, MCU executes interrupt program when it detect a level change, and gets value of current row and column, then set state that find the point by value of row and column of 1, and set it to highlight state when it’s lighted up next time. We see the whole dot matrix light up when increasing scanning speed, rather than one by one.

If you are interested in this pen write screen, click here to view more details: http://www.elecfreaks.com/7138.html

97
Website Questions / Re: Microphone circuit: error in fritzing
« Last post by barragan on July 05, 2014, 03:29:32 PM »
Thank you, we'll do a revision.
98
Website Questions / Microphone circuit: error in fritzing
« Last post by zamfi on July 01, 2014, 03:19:40 PM »
Hi!

A student of mine tried to make the circuit from the wire image here: http://wiring.org.co/learning/basics/microphone.html

But in the wire image and the schematic don't match up exactly -- in the wire image, the unbanded end of the diode mistakenly goes to pin 6 on the LM386, not pin 5 (as in the schematic).

Hope this helps someone out. :)

Best,
J.D.

100
Contributed Library Questions / Re: Adafruit LED Backpack library
« Last post by Jaime Patarroyo on June 27, 2014, 02:38:16 PM »
After changing all the int8_t for char, the uint8_t for unsigned char, the int16_t for int and the uint16_t for unsigned int the error kept on coming. But after learning that naming variables like that was a way for keeping the code more portable I was able to track the problem.

This function that worked in Arduino:

Code: [Select]
void Adafruit_LEDBackpack::writeDisplay(void) {
  Wire.beginTransmission(i2c_addr);
  Wire.write((uint8_t)0x00); // start at address $00

  for (uint8_t i=0; i<8; i++) {
    Wire.write(displaybuffer[i] & 0xFF);   
    Wire.write(displaybuffer[i] >> 8);   
  }
  Wire.endTransmission(); 
}

Needed some casting in Wiring:

Code: [Select]
void Adafruit_LEDBackpack::writeDisplay(void) {
  Wire.beginTransmission(i2c_addr);
  Wire.write((uint8_t)0x00); // start at address $00

  for (uint8_t i=0; i<8; i++) {
    Wire.write((uint8_t)displaybuffer[i] & 0xFF);   
    Wire.write((uint8_t)displaybuffer[i] >> 8);   
  }
  Wire.endTransmission(); 
}

It just made me wonder about the differences between the Wire library of both projects.

Thanks Hernando for the help.
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